Articles

404 ERROR: REQUEST COULD NOT BE FOUND

The page that you have requested could not be found at this time. We have provided you a list of related content below or you can use our site search to find the information that you are looking for.

JPMorgan Chase Uses AI Powered Video Game as a Recruitment Tool

Recent reports claim that JPMorgan Chase are trialing "neuroscience-based video games" from pymetrics as a intern recruiting tool. The games supposedly assess applicants' "social, cognitive and behavioral features, such as attention, memory and altruism," and attempt to identify what job the applicant might be best suited for. But, unlike Amazon's "biased" AI recruiting tool, pymetrics says their "Netflix-like recommendation algorithm" is fair and accurate. As the report mentions, it appears that companies are getting more comfortable with the use of machine learning powered recruitment tools, in spite of the potential pitfalls associated with their use.

Large firms have been increasingly turning to technology to make recruitment and other human resources processes more fair. Systems also include applications that scan performance reviews for unconscious bias or that monitor job ads for phrases that might dissuade a certain demographic from applying ."Our re-imagining of how we hire is part of a broader objective at the firm where we are asking ourselves: 'Can we better meet our diversity goals by broadening the pool of candidates we are considering?'," Mitro said. JPMorgan's pilot will continue with applicants for 2020 internships in the United States, he added, noting that this technology would only be one step of the selection process.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 18, 2019 10:00 AM (CDT)

Get Ready for Targeted Ads on Your Smart TV

Disney, Comcast, NBCUniversal, and other top media companies have teamed up with VIZIO for a new standard that will bring targeted ads to television viewers. VIZIO, which recently lost $2.2 million after being caught tracking and selling viewing data using software on its Smart TVs, claims targeted ads, which are "relevant" to the household, will "drastically enhance" the viewing experience.

The companies are calling themselves a consortium, and they've dubbed this "Project OAR," or Open Addressable Ready. Once developed, the new, open standard will make it possible for all connected TV companies to sell targeted ads in scheduled and on-demand programs. While this will theoretically make ads more successful and therefore more valuable, it also means viewers' data will be shared with third parties. That raises the usual data privacy concerns.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 17, 2019 2:45 PM (CDT)

Valve Doesn't Sound Too Happy about the Epic Store Copying Steam Data

Could a lawsuit be brewing? A spokesperson with Valve has told Bleeping Computer the company is "looking into what information the Epic launcher collects from Steam" following allegations the software was stealing users’ information without their express permission. Engineers with Epic have admitted some of the scrapped data could be sent to the company's servers.

In other words, Valve doesn't think the Epic Store client should be touching localconfig.vdf at all, and presumably would prefer it if Epic used the Steam API to gather friends lists. For Epic's part, it has not said that the entire file is uploaded, only that it parses out user IDs and uploads hashes of them, should users import Steam friends. In the future, Valve could potentially encrypt local user data to prevent the Epic client and other software from copying it.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 16, 2019 1:40 PM (CDT)

AdoredTV Reveals New AMD Leaks and Social Media Woes

In his newest video, Jim of AdoredTV on YouTube discusses fanboys, old school tech reviews, Zen II leaks, Ryzen 3000 leaks, overclocking the Radeon VII, and more. Listen to him reminisce over the days when reviewers told it like it was without a filter and then compare it to the advertiser friendly, nice guy image most have now. The beginning of the video is about his attempts to control what happens to him on social media. Enjoy!

Tech Talk 5 - Quitting Reddit, New Zen II "Leaks" and OC'ing the Radeon VII!

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 08, 2019 6:30 PM (CST)

NSA Releases Free "GHIDRA" Reverse Engineering Tool

Today, the NSA released its free "GHIDRA" software reverse engineering tool. It can be used to analyze malicious code and malware like viruses. Cybersecurity professionals can use it to better understand potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems. NSA will be making Ghidra available to the public as an open source release in time for its first public demonstration at the 2019 RSA Conference this March. For more NSA releases, check out CODE.NSA.GOV for open source, and NSA's Technology Transfer Program for other technology.

Key features of Ghidra: Includes a suite of software analysis tools for analyzing compiled code on a variety of platforms including Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Capabilities include disassembly, assembly, decompilation, graphing and scripting, and hundreds of other features. Supports a wide variety of processor instruction sets and executable formats and can be run in both user-interactive and automated modes. Users may develop their own Ghidra plug-in components and/or scripts using the exposed API.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 05, 2019 8:17 PM (CST)

Suicide Instructions Found Spliced into Kids' Cartoons on YouTube, YouTube Kids

YouTube continues its downward spiral: a contributing author for pedimom.com, a pediatrician-run parenting blog, recently discovered that tips for committing suicide were appearing in children’s cartoons on YouTube and the YouTube Kids app. In one video, a man who "resembles Internet personality Joji (formerly Filthy Frank)" shows up on screen and simulates cutting his wrist. "’Remember, kids, sideways for attention, longways for results,’ he says and then walks off screen. The video then quickly flips back to the cartoon."

"I am disturbed, I am saddened, I am disgusted," the physician wrote. "But I am also relieved that I was there to see this video with my own eyes, so that I could take the appropriate actions to protect my family." Those actions included deleting the YouTube Kids app and forever banning it from the house. That particular video was later taken down from YouTube Kids after the doctor reported it to YouTube. However, parents have since discovered that several other cartoons contain information about how to commit suicide, including the same spliced-in video clip.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 03, 2019 1:55 PM (CST)

Activision and EA CEOs Appear on List of "Most Overpaid" in the US

Non-profit foundation As You Sow has published its latest report of the 100 most overpaid CEOs, and Activision's Bobby Kotick and EA's Andrew Wilson made the list. Kotick is in the 45th spot with a pay of $28,698,375, which is "306 times more than his average employee." PC Gamer points out Activision "recently celebrated record profits while laying off hundreds." Wilson earned "$35,728,764, which is 371 times more than his average employee."

The report notes that while shareholders have started to oppose the huge amounts of cash being earned by CEOs generally, their pay is still increasing. "Yet overall CEO pay continues to increase. According to Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) the average pay for a CEO in the S&P 500 grew from $11.5 million in 2013 to $13.6 million in 2017. An analysis by the Economic Policy Institute, which includes the cashing in of stock options, found that 'in 2017 the average CEO of the 350 largest firms in the U.S. received $18.9 million in compensation, a 17.6 percent increase over 2016.'"

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 02, 2019 11:40 AM (CST)

YouTube TV and Hulu Are Outperforming the Competition

According to a report from Bloomberg, industry insiders say YouTube TV and Hulu are outperforming the competition in the live online TV services industry. Hulu's subscription total has nearly eclipsed the 2 million mark and YouTube TV has already broken the 1 million mark in subscribers. Both services are adding hundreds of thousands of customers each quarter. People are flocking to the services for "skinny bundles" which offer a narrow lineup of channels. Many consumers see this as a viable alternative to cable TV's hundreds of channels and high bills. Other similar services such as DirecTV Now are losing subscribers. "Sling is offering a 40 percent discount to attract new subscribers."

Hulu and YouTube represent a rare bit of good news for TV. They may be benefiting from a superior user experience compared with Sling or DirecTV Now, according to Alan Wolk, co-founder of the media consultancy TVRev. "They've done a better job of branding," Wolk said. "The interfaces are slick and modern looking, Hulu in particular.'" It also helps that neither YouTube nor Hulu is a cable or satellite company, which routinely rank among the least admired by U.S. consumers.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 01, 2019 4:45 PM (CST)

Samsung Loads McAfee Antivirus Onto Smart TVs

TechSpot reports that Samsung is pre-installing Mcafee antivirus on its 2019 TVs because McAfee is paying them to do it. As the publication points out, Samsung TVs run the partially open source, largely Samsung developed Tizen OS, so whatever software McAfee installs won't have much in common with McAfee security suites on other platforms. Financial benefits aside, TechSpot believes there's no real reason to run a "McAfee Security" app on the TV when Samsung could just bake similar security measures into OS itself. The Samsung Smart TV app ecosystem is strictly controlled anyway, and any malicious actors that really wanted to target Tizen would just work around McAfee since they know it will be pre-installed.

Officially, here is Samsung's statement on the matter: McAfee extended its contract to have McAfee Security for TV technology pre-installed on all Samsung Smart TVs produced in 2019. Along with being the market leader in the Smart TV category worldwide, Samsung is also the first company to pre-install security on these devices, underscoring its commitment to building security in from the start. McAfee Security for TV scans the apps that run on Samsung smart TVs to identify and remove malware.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas February 28, 2019 11:45 AM (CST)

Researchers Find a 19 Year Old Bug In WinRAR

Security researchers from Checkpoint have reportedly discovered a bug in WinRAR that just might be older than you. According to their bug report, recent version of WinRAR shipped with an ancient "unacev2.dll" file designed to decompress the equally ancient ACE archive format. A bug in the .dll lets malicious archives extract files to any location on the user's system, including the user's startup folder, which would allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code during the next startup. WinRAR has removed the vulnerable .dll file in the program's latest release, as no one unpacks ACE archives anymore, and it seems that the security researchers may have claimed a substantial bug bounty in the process. Thanks to The Register for spotting the exploit.

A few months ago, our team built a multi-processor fuzzing lab and started to fuzz binaries for Windows environments using the WinAFL fuzzer. After the good results we got from our Adobe Research, we decided to expand our fuzzing efforts and started to fuzz WinRAR too. One of the crashes produced by the fuzzer led us to an old, dated dynamic link library (dll) that was compiled back in 2006 without a protection mechanism (like ASLR, DEP, etc.) and is used by WinRAR. We turned our focus and fuzzer to this "low hanging fruit" dll, and looked for a memory corruption bug that would hopefully lead to Remote Code Execution. However, the fuzzer produced a test case with "weird" behavior. After researching this behavior, we found a logical bug: Absolute Path Traversal. From this point on it was simple to leverage this vulnerability to a remote code execution. Perhaps it's also worth mentioning that a substantial amount of money in various bug bounty programs is offered for these types of vulnerabilities.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas February 21, 2019 12:05 PM (CST)

Hackers Use Stolen Credentials from Data Breaches to "Hack" a Nest Thermostat

Jonathan Schisler thought his Amazon Alexa or kids had changed the temperature to 90 degrees on his Nest thermostat. But while scrolling through the device to clear a message about changing the air filter, he noticed that the email address on the device wasn't his wife's. Even his phone app was logged in under another person's name as the owner of the account. Nest says the Schisler family was affected by a data breach from another website where the credentials were initially exposed. Because the Schisler family used the same username and password for multiple websites, the hackers were able to commandeer the Nest thermostat. Taking stolen usernames and passwords from data breaches and inputting them into the login page of random websites is known as "credential stuffing."

Nest said it hasn't been breached. Instead, the company, which is owned by Google, said Schisler's password was breached on another website. For example, he was using the same password for his Nest thermostat that he used for another site. "In nearly all cases, two-factor verification eliminates this type of security risk," a Google spokesperson said. "We take security in the home extremely seriously, and we're actively introducing features that will reject compromised passwords, and allow customers to monitor access to their accounts and track external entities that abuse credentials."

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru February 20, 2019 8:02 AM (CST)

No Link between Violent Video Games and Increased Aggression in Teens, Study Finds

In one of the most "definitive" studies to date, Oxford University has concluded that while video games can provoke "angry feelings or reactions," there was "no correlation found between playing video games and aggressive behaviour in teenagers." Lead researcher and professor Andrew Przybylski accuses previous studies of using cherry-picked results to fabricate a "moral panic" surrounding video games.

...the "idea that violent video games drive real-world aggression is a popular one, but it hasn't tested very well over time". According to the university, this study is set apart from previous work by preregistration, where researchers publish their hypothesis, methods and analysis technique before beginning research. "Part of the problem in technology research is that there are many ways to analyse the same data, which will produce different results," said Przybylski.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith February 17, 2019 12:05 PM (CST)