Articles

404 ERROR: REQUEST COULD NOT BE FOUND

The page that you have requested could not be found at this time. We have provided you a list of related content below or you can use our site search to find the information that you are looking for.

Linux Gaming Across 9 Distros [Review in Progress]

Jason Evangelho of Forbes has started a Linux series where he reviews various Linux distributions (distros) for ease of use and performance in regards to Linux gaming. Jason's series isn't about just running benchmarks as he asks questions that everyday users would need to find out. Where am I going to get up-to-date graphics drivers for my AMD or NVIDIA graphics card? How is the default state of gaming on the Linux distro? Can I get Steam working right out of the box or am I going to have to tweak my system to accomplish this task? The 9 Linux distros that he is going to test in the series includes: Fedora 29 Workstation, Pop!_OS 18.10, Debian 9, Solus 4, Manjaro 18, Linux Mint 19, elementary OS 5, Deepin 15.9, and Ubuntu 18.10. His test system consists of an AMD Ryzen 5 2600, Radeon Sapphire RX 580, Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 1080 and more. So far he has tested Fedora 29 Workstation and Pop!_OS 18.10 with Pop!_OS 18.10 easily winning hands down in usability and performance. With the recent announcement that Google is leveraging Linux, Vulkan, first party games, and open-source AMD drivers for games running on its Google Stadia game streaming service; Linux gaming performance may enter into our PC gaming world very soon!

If you're an NVIDIA user, good news: Pop!_OS has a separate installer image for you which automatically installs the proprietary (and far more performant) graphics driver. Again, there's no need to enable alternative software sources or hit the command line. The moment your OS is installed you're ready to start gaming. You'll be using the latest and greatest stable driver, Nvidia 418.43. Radeon gamers have an advantage across several Linux distributions: the open source driver is part of the kernel (and thus ready to use immediately), well maintained and quite performant. This typically means less steps to get up and running with Steam and Steam Proton. One distinct difference between Pop!_OS and Fedora, however, is that Fedora runs with a much newer MESA driver. Specifically, Fedora 29 uses MESA 18.3.4 while Pop uses MESA 18.2.8. The kernel on Pop is also a bit older, but again I noticed no disadvantage on the gaming side save for one: updating your kernel to 5.0 will add Freesync support which is a feature I can't live without. It is quite literally a game-changer.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 20, 2019 12:23 PM (CDT)

Google GDC 2019 Gaming Announcement

Here is the Google GDC gaming announcement.

Gather around as we unveil Google's vision for the future of gaming at #GDC19.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 19, 2019 12:23 PM (CDT)

Not All RTX 2080s are Created Equal

Manufacturers have had some time to stock store shelves and warehouses with Nvidia RTX laptops, but as Techspot pointed out earlier this year, the nomenclature can be very confusing. The laptop "RTX 2080," for example, doesn't have the same performance as the desktop version of RTX 2080, and there are multiple version of the "RTX 2080 Max-Q" with different levels of performance. Hardware Unboxed tested the performance difference between the various versions, which you can see in the video below:
The fact that Nvidia can cram a 545mm^2 GPU into a low-power laptop at all is remarkable, and generally speaking, the RTX chips perform well in their relatively small power envelopes. But as the video points out, be careful if you're in the market for a gaming laptop, as the actual performance level of some RTX GPUs can be difficult to discern. Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 19, 2019 10:24 AM (CDT)

Real-Time Ray Tracing Support Comes to GeForce GTX GPUs and Game Engines

NVIDIA has announced that real-time ray tracing support is coming to GeForce GTX GPUs. This driver is scheduled to launch in April. GeForce GTX GPUs will execute ray traced effects on shader cores and support is extended to both Microsoft DXR and Vulkan APIs. NVIDIA reminds consumers that its GeForce RTX lineup of cards has dedicated ray tracing cores built directly into the GPU which deliver the ultimate ray tracing experience. GeForce RTX GPUs provide up to 2-3x faster ray tracing performance with a more visually immersive gaming environment than GPUs without dedicated ray tracing cores. NVIDIA GameWorks RTX is a comprehensive set of tools and rendering techniques that help game developers add ray tracing to games. Unreal Engine and Unity have announced that integrated real-time ray tracing support is being built into their engines.

Real-time ray tracing support from other first-party AAA game engines includes DICE/EA's Frostbite Engine, Remedy Entertainment's Northlight Engine and engines from Crystal Dynamics, Kingsoft, Netease and others. Quake II RTX -- uses ray tracing for all of the lighting in the game in a unified lighting algorithm called path tracing. The classic Quake II game was modified in the open source community to support ray tracing and NVIDIA's engineering team further enhanced it with improved graphics and physics. Quake II RTX is the first ray-traced game using NVIDIA VKRay, a Vulkan extension that allows any developer using Vulkan to add ray-traced effects to their games.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 18, 2019 10:09 PM (CDT)

Logitech M185 and Other Mice are Vulnerable to Keystroke Injection

According to a recent post on David Sopas' security blog, the very popular, and very cheap, Logitech M185 is vulnerable to a keystroke injection attack. Using a recent version of the "Bettercap" hacking toolkit and a 2.4ghz USB dongle, the security researcher used the mouse to open a script which, in this particular case, simply opened a calculator instance on Windows. While it wasn't on the "affected mouse" list, the M185 is apparently part of a wide variety of mice that are affected by similar exploits. Thanks to cageymaru for the tip, and check out the demonstration below:

Just a simple PoC where I took an Logitech M185 wireless mouse and hijacked it to launch my DuckyScript on the victims machine - in this case just popping up the Windows calculator.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 18, 2019 12:12 PM (CDT)

Gaming Display Prices are Dropping

As anyone who recently built or updated a PC probably noticed, memory and GPU prices were conspicuously high throughout most of 2018 and late 2017. But, as we've said before, memory prices are dropping like a rock, while GPU prices are starting to level out thanks to the crypto mining bust. According to a recent report, another important component for any PC is expected to get cheaper throughout 2019. Digitimes claims that competition among "gaming monitor" manufacturers is starting to "heat up" as more Chinese LCD manufacturers enter the market. TV-size panel production is expected to grow as well, and OLED TVs in particular could get significantly cheaper as more OLED factories come online.

However, China's panel makers including BOE Technology, CPC-Panda LCD Technology and China Star Optoelectronics Technology (CSOT) have recently stepped into the gaming panel sector, encouraged by government policy support and high profits generated by such products. The growing competition has sent gaming monitor panel prices falling sharply, with models with refresh rates of 144Hz and below being hit hardest, indicated the sources. Prices of 144Hz and below gaming panels fell 10% on average in 2018 and has dropped another 5% so far in 2019, as most China-based suppliers are focusing on this segment, said the sources, noting that the prices of 144Hz models will continue to fall in the second quarter.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 14, 2019 8:47 AM (CDT)

Gigabyte Factory Tour Shows Motherboard Manufacturing from Start-To-Finish

Gamers Nexus recently took a tour of the Gigabyte factory located on Nanping Road in Taiwan. At this location, Gigabyte manufacturers both video cards and motherboards. Although most of the SMT factory is automated, some of the components and wires must be installed by hand. It takes 40 - 50 minutes for a motherboard to be created and Gigabyte processes 600 - 800 motherboards per hour or about 5,000 per 8 hour workday. Make sure that you compare the Gigabyte tour to the MSI factory tour that Hardocp documented in 2007. I thought it was fascinating that the Gigabyte "museum" featured test equipment similar to what Hardocp observed over a decade ago. My, how things have changed!

Motherboard manufacturing is a refined process, but each board still takes upwards of an hour to finalize on the assembly line. About half of the assembly is now done by automated SMT lines, with the rest being manual quality checks and large component installation (like PCIe slots). As for how to make a video card, it follows exactly the same process -- the difference is just which board is being fed through the machines on each day.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 13, 2019 8:59 PM (CDT)

Dell Technologies Gains Global Market Share in Server and Storage in Q4 2018

According to research from IDC, Dell Technologies has been gaining market share on Hewlett Packard Enterprises (HPE) in the worldwide server and storage market. In Q4 2018, Dell captured 18.7% global share of the server market, up from 17.5% in 2017. This created $4.43 billion in server revenue which represents more than a 20% increase over the $3.68 billion Dell made year over year (YoY). HPE grew its revenue by 10.5% YoY as its market share fell to 18.1% in Q4 2018. HPE made $4.2 billion in revenue in Q4 2018. Globally, the server market in Q4 2018 grew 12.6% to $23.6 billion. In the storage market, Dell again dominated as it increased its market share from 19.3% to 20.6% YoY. Dell made close to $3 billion in revenue; a 15% increase YoY. HPE trailed Dell with $2.6 billion in revenue in the global storage market. HPE's market share fell from 19.2% to 18% in Q4 2018. The global storage market grew 7.4% to $14.5 billion in Q4 2018.

Winslow said Dell's broad storage and serer portfolio is winning deals for his company over HPE, including a recent healthcare organization that added Dell servers for the first time that had previously bought HPE. "Dell has the technology there in spades - whether its blade technology, rack technology, a phenomenal hyper-converged portfolio, a full portfolio for structured and unstructured data -- and they continue to improve on it under Jeff Clarke," said Winslow, adding that his company's Dell business is up 43 percent year over year.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 11, 2019 2:33 PM (CDT)

MSI Gaming Monitor Stops a Stray Bullet (and Still Works)

PC gamer Eric Gan had five gunshots fired into his room Monday, one of which managed to hit the back of his monitor, an MSI Optix G27C2. Even if he were gaming at the time, he’d still be alive thanks to the display, which blocked the bullet from getting any further into the room. Incredibly, the monitor still works, but MSI is sending him a replacement anyway.

Of course, the bullet had already lost a significant amount of kinetic energy from penetrating through the wall before hitting the monitor. Had that not been the case, we expect the monitor would be in much worse shape. Either way, we're glad that Gan and his neighbors were unharmed in the incident.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 09, 2019 10:50 AM (CST)

AlphaCool Eisblock for 2080 Ti Startup

We show you the AlphaCool Eisblock for RTX 2080 Ti and just how the coolant flows through the block. If you have a 4K display, you will want to go full screen with this short clip. This is the GPX-N Plexi M01 model. It is on sale at Amazon for $172, complete with Frag Harder Disco Lights! You can see our preliminary coverage here.

All coolers are based on an identical copper heat sink, which is completely nickel-plated. The surface area where the water flows is very large, so that all components that give off heat are actively cooled with water which increases performance. The 35 fins of the cooler are only 0.6 mm thick and cover even large GPUs completely. The large cooling surface is also ideal for graphics cards with HBM memory.

Discussion
Posted by Kyle March 05, 2019 3:03 PM (CST)

THQ Nordic Apologizes for Hosting AMA on 8chan

On Tuesday, THQ Nordic decided to host an "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) on 8chan, an imageboard website said to be notorious for racism, hate speech, and child pornography. Naturally, it didn’t turn out well, as the Darksiders III publisher was quickly criticized by both fans and the gaming media for associating with that crowd. "We got approached in a very friendly and polite manner and were assured, said person (shoutout to Mark) will take care of the nasty stuff."

Mark, whoever he is, did not take care of the nasty stuff. The ensuing AMA contained pornographic imagery, Hitler references and memes, copious questions about loli, racial slurs, and so much more. There were also more standard questions about THQ Nordic’s future plans, which PR and marketing director Philipp Brock replied to. In one case, a user said, "Please don’t censor any games nor appeal to the SocJus crowd, you guys are doing fine as is," to which Brock replied, "Thanks! We’ll try to stay that way."

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 03, 2019 2:20 PM (CST)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Turing Specs Allegedly Leak: 1.4GHz Base Clock, 4GB GDDR5

Bangkok-based leaker APISAK (@TUM_APISAK) has posted a 3DMark screenshot revealing the alleged specs of NVIDIA’s upcoming GeForce GTX 1650 GPU, which will reportedly launch alongside the GTX 1660 in spring. The Turing-based card is listed with a 1,395MHz base clock and 1,560MHz boost clock, and 4GB of presumed GDDR5 memory: "Past leaks peg the memory bus at 128-bit, and with a 2,000MHz effective clock speed, that would give the card 128GB/s of memory bandwidth."

...we can reasonably surmise that this will be yet another Turing card that lacks RT and Tensor cores, which are what give GeForce RTX series cards their real-time ray tracing and Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) mojo. NVIDIA rightly recognized that gamers at large are waiting for both features to be more widely supported before investing in the necessary hardware. Hence why the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti exists -- it lacks those features and is the least expensive Turing card on the market.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 02, 2019 9:40 AM (CST)