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What Happens When You Water Cool an Air Cooler?

What happens when you try to water cool and air cooling tower? One YouTuber decided decided to find out, as he sealed the upper part of a Hyper 212 EVO inside a closed ice loop. The setup managed to keep and overclocked 2500k at a stable 44C under load, but just how practical such a setup would be long-term remains to be seen. Check out the experiment below:

Ever since I can remember, when it comes to CPU cooling there are two main options, water cooling or air cooling. That got me thinking, why cant you do both. I took my Hyper 212 EVO and set out to water cool it, I thought it would be cool But I had not idea it would work this well.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 18, 2019 9:09 AM (CDT)

AMD's 7nm Navi GPU Rumored to Launch Roughly a Month after Ryzen 3000

Contradicting earlier rumors of an October launch, the Wccftech gang is claiming AMD has told partners its 7nm Navi GPU will launch "exactly a month" after the debut of its next-generation Ryzen processors. With the conundrum of low yields somewhat out of the way (based on the availability of the Radeon VII), the author is confident AMD will have no issues getting the card out within the third quarter this year.

I have been told that AMD’s Navi GPU is at least one whole month behind AMD’s 7nm Ryzen launch, so if the company launches the 3000 series desktop processors at Computex like they are planning to, you should not expect the Navi GPU to land before early August. The most likely candidates for launch during this window are Gamescom and Siggraph. I would personally lean towards Gamescom simply because it is a gaming product and is the more likely candidate, but anything can happen with AMD!

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 17, 2019 2:15 PM (CDT)

Tesla Unveils Model Y Electric SUV with 300-Mile Range and Seven Seats

Tesla officially announced the latest member of its vehicle family Thursday, the Model Y, a crossover/compact SUV version of the Model 3 starting at $39,000. The Y is rather similar appearance-wise but sits a little higher, offering 66 cubic feet (1.9 cubic meters) of storage space and an optional third row for up to seven seats. Specs include 300 miles of range, expected 5-star rating, 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds, and a 0.23 drag coefficient.

The more expensive versions of Model Y with a bigger battery pack, dual motor, and higher performance are going to come first in Fall 2020. This one is likely going to use the same Long Range battery pack as Model 3 and it is getting a slightly shorter range due to the size. Instead of opening reservations with a $1,000 deposit like they did for the Model 3, Tesla already launched the Model Y online design studio and buyers can place an order with a $2,500 deposit.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 16, 2019 10:15 AM (CDT)

Huawei Caught Using DSLR Shots in P30 Marketing

Some eagle eyed readers over at GSMArena recently discovered that Huawei used professional DLSR shots to market the periscope zoom camera on the Huawei P30. Much like Samsung's fake Galaxy advertisements from last year, the posters weren't marked as DSLR shots at first, and they were clearly implied to be shots from the P30, but the Weibo photos were seemingly updated with disclaimers after various media outlets started catching on. In an official statement, Huawei claims the photos "are only intended to hint at the unique new features."

We've been made aware that there might have been some misunderstanding regarding our recent HUAWEI P30 Series teaser posters. We would like to reiterate that those are, in fact, only teaser posters, and are only intended to hint at the unique new features that will come with the HUAWEI P30 Series. Huawei has acquired the licenses to the original images and the posters are artistic renditions of said features only. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank the media for their interest in our posters. We have much to announce in the coming weeks. Please stay tuned!

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 13, 2019 8:26 AM (CDT)

Researchers Develop RAM That Works at 300C

A group of researchers claim to have developed gallium nitride memory devices that can work at temperatures over 300 degrees Celcius (or 572 Fahrenheit, which is coincidentally about 572 Kelvin as well). As any overclocker already knows, silicon-based transistors don't work particularly well above 100C, and the researchers' paper claims that previous GaN devices topped off at about 200C. However, they say their memory device survived exposure to temperatures above 350C, and performed a thousand switching cycles at 300C with almost no deterioration, but don't expect this technology to improve your overclocking anytime soon. The researchers envision this technology being used in exploration probes destined for some of the harshest places in our solar system, and say they're testing a device that can survive temperatures of up to 500C.

The memory device was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition on a gallium nitride substrate. Key to the device's performance were the etching and regrowth processes during fabrication, says Zhao. After several layers of gallium nitride were deposited, some areas were etched away with plasma, then regrown. That created an interface layer with vacancy sites that are missing nitrogen atoms, says Zhao. "The interface layer is critical for the memory effect," he says. The researchers believe that the nitrogen vacancies are responsible for capturing and releasing electrons, giving rise to high and low resistance states-or zero and one states-in the device... The team is also investigating the role of the nitrogen vacancies for the device's performance. Once NASA deems a prototype good enough, it will have to undergo testing in controlled chambers that mimic the harsh environments on Mercury and Venus at NASA facilities, says Zhao. "I will say there is several years of work to do, but the initial result is definitely very, very encouraging and exciting," he says.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas March 11, 2019 11:53 AM (CDT)

AMD Showcases Ryzen V1000 and EPYC 3000 at Embedded World 2019

At Embedded World 2019, AMD unveiled its expanded partner embedded product lines based on its AMD Ryzen V1000 and EPYC 3000 platforms. Embedded GPUs and the SMACH Z handheld gaming console that can be upgraded like a desktop PC were highlights of the event. Advantech announced a partnership between Advantech, AMD, and Mentor, a Siemens business, to make AI technology more accessible and easier to implement. They declared AI technology will take embedded systems to the next level with higher efficiency and smarter systems designed to improve people's lives. The PC Games Hardware interview is in English after the first minute.

Chalk this one up to I did not know that AMD had embedded GPUs, but the segment makes sense. TUL is the manufacturer of the three GPUs based on AMD for the embedded market. These seem to be mostly targeted at multi-output embedded products for features like support for between four and six monitors.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 04, 2019 2:58 PM (CST)

Singaporean Retailer Lists Purported Ryzen 3000 Pricing

Bizgram, a Singaporean distributor, has published a catalog listing AMD’s upcoming Ryzen 3000 "Zen 2" range of CPUs and their alleged pricing. These include the Ryzen 5 3600X at $229, Ryzen 7 3700X at $329, and Ryzen 9 3850X at $499. According to Tom’s Hardware, the listing correlates with AdoredTV's leak last year. "It's hard to say what's happened here with this listing. Perhaps Bizgram just copied the rumored spec sheet and guessed what pricing would be, essentially listing the pricing as a placeholder."

...at this stage, it's unlikely prices have been finalized down to the dollar (and the prices are in Singaporean dollars, by the way). Usually, with these types of listings, prices do end up changing. For example, the Xeon W 3175 and the Core i9-9900K were listed at much higher prices than they actually launched at across several retailers. Bizgram did, however, leak 9th gen Intel prices and some specifications a month before they launched, with prices being very accurate compared to launch prices, so the retailer does have some credibility.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith March 03, 2019 9:30 AM (CST)

Revenue from Music Streaming Services Grew 30% in 2018

According to the RIAA 2018 Year-End Music Industry Revenue Report, revenue from streaming music platforms grew 30% year-over-year (YoY) in 2018. Revenue from streaming music platforms was $7.4 billion and contributed to 75% of the total revenue from 2018. Nearly all U.S. music industry revenue growth in 2018 came from streaming music platforms! Subscriptions to music streaming services accounted for more than half of total revenues for the year as subscription revenue increased 32% to $5.4 billion. The industry averaged over one million new subscriptions added on a monthly basis. Over 50 million people subscribe to a paid music service as the amount of subscribers grew 42% in 2018. Revenue from digital radio stations grew 32% YoY to $1.2 billion and exceeded the $1 billion mark for the first time. Permanent digital-download sales fell 25% YoY as the category experienced its sixth consecutive year of decline. Physical products declined 23% YoY with CD sales declining 34% to $698 million. This is the first time since 1986 that revenue from CD sales has been less than $1 billion. On a positive note, the revenue from vinyl sales was up 8%. This is the highest level for the category since 1988. Vinyl contributed to 33% of revenues from the physical category.

Revenues from on-demand streaming services supported by advertising (including YouTube, Vevo, and the free version of Spotify) grew 15% annually to $760 million, a slower rate than other streaming formats. These types of services streamed more than 400 billion songs to listeners in the Unites States, more than one-third of an estimated total of 1.2 trillion streams, yet contributed only 8% to total revenues for the year.

Discussion
Posted by cageymaru March 01, 2019 3:24 PM (CST)

Got a Spare $43,000? You Could Spend It All on This Monster Gaming PC

OverclockersUK is selling a gaming PC that costs almost as much as a Tesla Model 3: for $43,000, filthy rich enthusiasts get a tower that is actually two systems in one, comprising three NVIDIA Titan RTX GPUs, a liquid-cooled and overclocked 18C/36T Intel Core i9-7890XE and 8C/8T i9-9700K, 144GB of DDR4 RAM, eight 2TB Samsung SSDs, and a 2000W power supply. Handle with care, UPS.

For those of us who fantasize about the dream PC we’ll buy as soon as our lottery numbers come up, here’s an option to consider: the OrionX2 from OverclockersUK. It costs the equivalent of just over $43,000, or around 20 high-end gaming PCs. 43 grand is, of course, an awful lot of money for a computer, but this isn’t your everyday PC. Designed by overclocking champion Ian "8Pack" Parry, the OrionX2 is actually two overclocked systems packed into one case, making it a workstation/gaming machine combo.

Discussion
Posted by Megalith February 23, 2019 2:25 PM (CST)

Rumor: AMD Ryzen 3000 "Matisse" Launching July 7

Paul from Red Gaming Tech claims AMD is launching its next-generation Ryzen 3000 "Matisse" processors and the X570 platform on July 7. Navi may also land on this date, although his source is less certain about the GPU, echoing recent reports of TSMC unable to meet 7nm demand. Intel will counter with Comet Lake parts, but Paul suggests it will be an uphill battle for sure, as AMD has the core count advantage.

I do wonder (as a bit of speculation) if AMD will opt to hold back the 16 core processors initially, both because of yields and also to sandbag and then counter Comet Lake with a 16 core Matisse part. So essentially 12 core Ryzen 3000 will fight the 8 core I9-9900K, with the 10 core Comet Lake having the displeasuring of facing the might of a 16-core Zen 2 Matisse. This is just a possible scenario though, and nothing my source has said, but would be about the worst case for customers (I don’t think AMD will choose to do this though).

Discussion
Posted by Megalith February 16, 2019 5:25 PM (CST)

Intel HD 630 IGPs can Run the Division 2 at 30 FPS

Intel IGPs don't have the best reputation, but as we've mentioned before, Intel's Graphics division is looking to change that. Intel told us that they expect their next generation integrated GPUs to run twice as fast as the current generation, but in the meantime, they've been working to optimize games on Coffee Lake IGPs. The company's YouTube channel just uploaded a video of the Division 2 running on a Core i5-7500 with 2400Mhz RAM at 30FPS.
All things considered, that's somewhat impressive, as the game seems to be running faster than the original Division on the exact same rig. Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas February 08, 2019 12:59 PM (CST)

Bounty Hunters Can Get Phone Locations for $300

Motherboard just posted an article claiming that T-Mobile, Sprint, and AT&T are selling customer data that ultimately allows individuals to geolocate U.S. phones with nothing but a phone number. Journalist Joseph Cox gave a phone number and $300 to a "bounty hunter," and quickly got a Google Maps screenshot with a relatively accurate location of the phone back. Apparently, major telecommunication providers are selling geolocation "services" to a number of private companies, and those services end up being resold on the black market without their knowledge.

The bounty hunter did this all without deploying a hacking tool or having any previous knowledge of the phone's whereabouts. Instead, the tracking tool relies on real-time location data sold to bounty hunters that ultimately originated from the telcos themselves, including T-Mobile, AT&T, and Sprint, a Motherboard investigation has found. These surveillance capabilities are sometimes sold through word-of-mouth networks.... In the case of the phone we tracked, six different entities had potential access to the phone's data. T-Mobile shares location data with an aggregator called Zumigo, which shares information with Microbilt. Microbilt shared that data with a customer using its mobile phone tracking product. The bounty hunter then shared this information with a bail industry source, who shared it with Motherboard.

Discussion
Posted by alphaatlas January 10, 2019 11:09 AM (CST)